CHRISTOPHER STEVENS reviews last night's TV: Clive's trip to Jamaica proves pride in your heritage is deeply important

Clive Myrie's Caribbean Adventure (BBC2)

One of the most ghastly blunders anyone can commit is to ask a black or Asian person in Britain, 'Where are you from?' The question is now deemed unforgivably racist.

Susan Hussey, a Lady of the Household to King Charles, learned this to her cost in 2022 when, at a reception hosted by Queen Camilla, she innocently asked the question of a guest, charity organiser Ngozi Fulani.

Baroness Susan was obliged to apologise and relinquish her royal duties, though she has since been quietly welcomed back into the palace fold.

Yet, as presenter Clive Myrie emphasises on his Caribbean Adventure, family roots are deeply important to most people. To ignore that seems, to me at least, equally insensitive.

As presenter Clive Myrie emphasises on his Caribbean Adventure (pictured), family roots are deeply important to most people, writes Christopher Stevens

As presenter Clive Myrie emphasises on his Caribbean Adventure (pictured), family roots are deeply important to most people, writes Christopher Stevens

On a coffee farm in the Blue Mountains north of the capital, Kingston, he joined his older sister Judith, who recently moved back to Jamaica from the UK

On a coffee farm in the Blue Mountains north of the capital, Kingston, he joined his older sister Judith, who recently moved back to Jamaica from the UK

Clive was born in Bolton, Lancashire, to parents who had recently emigrated from Jamaica. One of the chief figureheads of BBC News, he's as British as it's possible to be. He also adores his heritage and loves his mum and dad's homeland, known to its population as 'the Rock'.

That fondness, instilled during childhood family holidays, came across loudly. His enthusiasm seemed much less academic, much more visceral, than it was in his Italian travelogue last year.

On a coffee farm in the Blue Mountains north of the capital, Kingston, he joined his older sister Judith, who recently moved back to Jamaica from the UK.

Judith spent her first seven years on the island, she reminded Clive. Her return felt like 'coming home . . . I mean, look at it, the fresh air, the fresh food, the sunshine, the people, everything'.

Leaving the grandmother who brought her up and arriving in Britain as a small girl was 'traumatic on many levels', she said. 'The climate, the family . . . School was horrendous — and the food!'

But she knew what a sacrifice their parents had made to start a new life, she said, 'so we made the best of it'.

It was moving to hear such a heartfelt admission, and saddening to know that political correctness makes it difficult to address such natural emotions.

'Where are you from?' is not inherently a racist question, though it's obviously wrong to assume anyone is an immigrant based on their skin colour. The real racism is the assumption that life in Britain must automatically be better in every way than the world left behind.

One of the most ghastly blunders anyone can commit is to ask a black or Asian person in Britain, 'Where are you from?' Susan Hussey (pictured, at King Charles's coronation in 2023) learned this to her cost in 2022 when, at a reception hosted by Queen Camilla , she innocently asked the question of a guest, charity organiser Ngozi Fulani

One of the most ghastly blunders anyone can commit is to ask a black or Asian person in Britain, 'Where are you from?' Susan Hussey (pictured, at King Charles's coronation in 2023) learned this to her cost in 2022 when, at a reception hosted by Queen Camilla , she innocently asked the question of a guest, charity organiser Ngozi Fulani

The real racism is the assumption that life in Britain must automatically be better in every way than the world left behind

The real racism is the assumption that life in Britain must automatically be better in every way than the world left behind

Clive's travels, which continue in Jamaica this evening, showcased the beauty and turbulent history of the island. In Boston Bay, where surfers sported in the turquoise water, he joined chef Tica Thompson to prepare jerk pork with a searing seasoning of scotch bonnet peppers.

He tried his luck at stilt-walking — 'I will be getting high,' he quipped, alluding to the island's traditional relaxations.

And he stripped to his trunks for a dip in a cliff-top pool at an 'eco-tourism resort', with the Atlantic breakers crashing below. 'The closest place to paradise on Earth,' he called Jamaica, and with that view, it really did look like it.

OTHER NEWS

34 minutes ago

Hunt bites back at Latrell claim

34 minutes ago

ATO's tax warning for Aussies ahead of July 1

34 minutes ago

Noah Lyles races to 100-meter title at US Olympic track and field trials

36 minutes ago

3 Alabama men die after getting caught in rip current off Florida beach

39 minutes ago

Trump says he’s decided on his 2024 running mate

39 minutes ago

Crews fight large fire at commercial building in Paisley

39 minutes ago

Researchers anticipate impact on coastal range after species reintroduction: 'A previously missing piece of our natural history'

41 minutes ago

Unbeaten Roughriders pounce on winless Tiger-Cats 36-20

41 minutes ago

Legacy on the line as Latrell braces for Origin return

41 minutes ago

Conditions won't dampen NSW spirits in women's decider

43 minutes ago

Robert Pattinson speaks about fatherhood months after welcoming baby

44 minutes ago

'Economic insanity': fallout spreads from nuclear plan

44 minutes ago

Report: Dan Gilbert Could Hire Kenny Atkinson As Cavaliers Coach Since Tom Izzo Is An Atkinson fan

44 minutes ago

Will Patriots Veteran Cornerback Earn Roster Spot in 2024?

44 minutes ago

Ryan Blaney slams Michael McDowell for late spin at New Hampshire

44 minutes ago

The Bell strikes two: Race Rewind from New Hampshire

44 minutes ago

Prince Harry's soldier pal says hardest challenge was leaving wife to go on Netflix show

44 minutes ago

Steelers Starting Justin Fields Should Be A Worst-Case Scenario: 'If He Plays, Something Has Gone Wrong'

44 minutes ago

NASCAR at New Hampshire weather updates: USA Today 301 halted as rain, lightning spill onto track

52 minutes ago

Bahrain Bourse closes down Sunday

52 minutes ago

Kyle Busch's 2024 season hits rock bottom at New Hampshire

52 minutes ago

Kristi Noem looks furious in interview

52 minutes ago

Houthi Aerial Drone Hits Ship in Red Sea

52 minutes ago

Manuel caps US Olympic swimming trials with 50m free win

52 minutes ago

Food Empire to get up to $54 million from new strategic investor Ikhlas Capital

52 minutes ago

Aust shares stumble as retail demand shows slowing

54 minutes ago

Missing California hiker says he survived on creek water before being found 9 days later

57 minutes ago

USMNT's 'selfless leader' Pulisic inspires win over Bolivia

57 minutes ago

Christopher Bell wins wild NASCAR Cup Series race at New Hampshire

57 minutes ago

Who won the NASCAR race today? Full results, standings from 2024 USA Today 301 in New Hampshire

57 minutes ago

‘Meghan feels bad for Kate’: Sussexes reached out to the Princess of Wales before royal return

57 minutes ago

China agrees to electric car tariff talks as EU fights to avoid trade war

57 minutes ago

Scheffler wins 6th of the year at Travelers in protest-marred finish. Yang wins 1st LPGA major

58 minutes ago

Big push to give Aussies five weeks of leave

58 minutes ago

Cricket-Afghanistan's Khan can finally sleep after avenging Australia defeat

58 minutes ago

Rishi Sunak meets representatives of nighttime economy

58 minutes ago

LCBO union sets strike date for Fri. July 5th

58 minutes ago

Hunt wants to Cook up a new deal at Dragons

1 hour ago

Asia-Pacific markets slip; Australia and Japan inflation data expected this week

1 hour ago

Video: Jason Kelce goes crazy in hilarious clip from Taylor Swift's Eras Tour show as Eagles icon jumps around to 'Shake It Off' next to brother Travis in London